Full Title:Principles of Professional Practice
Module Code:PRPF B8001
 
Credits: 5
Valid From:Semester 1 - 2013/14 ( September 2013 )
Module Delivered in 1 programme(s)
Module Description:no description provided
Learning Outcomes:
On successful completion of this module the learner should be able to
  1. Analyse the inter-relationship between knowledge, skills and attitudes/values and explain that social care professionals require; a knowledge base which allows for informed decision making, critical analysis and reflection, a skills base with a demonstrable level of competence and a values base applicable to complex situations where there are competing priorities and needs.
  2. Identify the impact of poverty, unemployment, mental health, disability, lack of education and other sources of disadvantage that lead to marginalisation, isolation and exclusion of service users and critically consider the effectiveness of the response of social care professionals.
  3. Critically evaluate the significance of inter-relationships between social services, education, housing, health, income maintenance and criminal justice and services provided in partnership with social care professionals.
  4. Demonstrate that a social care professional must protect the rights and promote the interests and the independence of service users while protecting them as far as possible from danger or harm and must uphold public trust and confidence in social care services.
  5. Accept that a social care professional, must be accountable for the quality of their work and take responsibility for maintaining and improving knowledge and skills.
  6. Critically reflect on the importance of interagency collaboration in providing an effective and comprehensive social care service
 

Module Content & Assessment

Indicative Content
Professional competence, professional responsibility & accountability and ethical practice.
The knowledge, understanding and skills to promote and protect individual and collective well being. Understanding and working within the contested nature, scope and purpose of social care in a diverse society. The application of a professional value base in complex situations where there are competing priorities and needs. “If you were a user of a social care service what knowledge, skills and attitudes do you think a social care professional would need to provide you with appropriate care?”
The inter-relationship and synthesis of the knowledge, skills and attitudes of the social care professional.
The fundamental importance of developing professional social care workers, whose practice is founded on values, carried out in a skilled manner and informed by knowledge, critical analysis and reflection. “If you were a user of a social care service what advice would you give a social care professional about what are the most important priorities in providing a service to others?”
Linking theory to practice.
Critically assessing the impact of poverty, unemployment, mental health, disability, lack of education and other sources of disadvantage that lead to marginalisation, isolation and exclusion of service users and critically considering the effectiveness of the response of social care professionals. “If you were a user of a social care service do you think the social care professional should know what is best for you?”
Advocacy, self advocacy, person centred and user-led social care services.
Development and change in social care and the need for continuous professional development. “If you were a user of a social care service would you like the social care professional caring for you to stick up for you?”
Working in collaboration with individuals, families and communities using an ethical, rights based perspective.
The interrelationships between social services, education, housing, health, income maintenance and criminal justice and services provided in partnership with social care professionals. “If you were a user of a social care service do you think the social care professional caring for you should share personal information about you with other professionals?”
Assessment Breakdown%
Course Work50.00%
End of Module Formal Examination50.00%

Full Time

Course Work
Assessment Type Assessment Description Outcome addressed % of total Marks Out Of Pass Marks Assessment Date Duration
Portfolio n/a 1 50.00 0 0 n/a 0
No Project
No Practical
No End of Module Formal Examination
Reassessment Requirement
Reattendance
The assessment of this module is inextricably linked to the delivery. Therefore reassessment on this module will require the student to reattend (i.e. retake) the module in its entirety.
Reassessment Description
Essay, presentation

DKIT reserves the right to alter the nature and timings of assessment

 

Module Workload & Resources

Workload: Full Time
Workload Type Workload Description Hours Frequency Average Weekly Learner Workload
Lecture No Description 3.00 Every Week 3.00
Tutorial No Description 3.00 Every Week 3.00
Directed Reading No Description 3.00 Every Week 3.00
Total Weekly Learner Workload 9.00
Total Weekly Contact Hours 6.00
This course has no Part Time workload.
Resources
Recommended Book Resources
  • Brown, K. and Rutter, L 2008, Critical Thinking for Social Work, Learning Matters
  • Cottrell, S 2005, Critical Thinking Skills: Developing Effective Analysis and Argument., Palgrave Macmillan New York
  • Ferguson, Harry. 2011, Child Protection Practice, Palgrave Macmillian New York
  • Hamer, S & Collinson, G 2005, Achieving Evidence-based Practice, A Handbook for Practitioners, Second Ed., Elsevier Ltd
  • Quinney, A, Collaborative Social Work Practice,, Learning Matters Exeter, England.
Supplementary Book Resources
  • Banks, S., Ethics, accountability and the social professions., London: Palgrave Macmillan. (2004)
  • Brechin, A., H. Brown & M.A. Eby, Critical Practice in Health and Social Care, London, Sage (2000)
  • Davies, C., L. Finlay, & A. Bullman., Changing Practice in Health and Social Care , London, Sage (2000)
  • Department of Health, A Vision for Change: Report of the Expert Group on Mental Health Policy, Dublin, Stationery Office (2006)
  • Gilbert, P. & Thompson, N., Supervision & Leadership Skills: A Training Resource Pack, Wrexham, Learning Curve Publishing (2002)
  • Morrison, T., Staff Supervision in Social Care (2nd Edition), Brighton, Pavilion (1993/2001)
  • O’Connor, T & Murphy, M, Social Care in Ireland, Cork, CIT (2006)
  • Schon, D.A., The Reflective Practitioner, New York, Basic Books (1983)
  • Share, P. & N. McElwee, ‘The professionalisation of social care in Ireland?’ In P. Share & N. McElwee (eds) Applied social care: An introduction for Irish students, Dublin: Gill and Macmillan (2005).
  • Sussex, F & Scourfield, P, Social Care, Oxford, Heinemann (2004)
  • Thompson, N., Theory & Practice in Human Services (2nd Edition), Buckingham, Open University (2000)
  • Thompson, N., People Skills (2nd Edition), Basingstoke, Palgrave (2002)
Recommended Article/Paper Resources
  • Forbat, L. and Atkinson, D 2005, Advocacy in Practice: The Troubled Position of Advocates in Adult Services., British Journal of Social Work, Vol. 35., 321–335
Other Resources
  • n/a: www.itsligo.ie/gateway Social Care Gateway
  • n/a: www.scie-socialcareonline.org.uk/ Social Care Online
  • n/a: www.niscc.info/ Northern Ireland Social Care Council
  • n/a: www.basw.co.uk/ British Association of Social Workers
  • n/a: www.iasw.ie/ Irish Association of Social Workers
  • n/a: www.careandhealth.com
  • n/a: www.communitycare.co.uk/ Community Care- Website & Journal
  • n/a: www.socialcaremagazine.com/ Social Care Magazine
  • n/a: Irish Journal of Applied Social Studies
  • n/a: British Journal of Social Work

Module Delivered in

Programme Code Programme Semester Delivery
DK_HSOCA_8 Bachelor of Arts (Honours) in Social Care 7 Mandatory